Expansion

May 14, 2014 | Posted by Dan in Science Exchange News |
The Science Exchange team (May 2014).

The Science Exchange team (May 2014).

Another few months, another exciting update on our ever-expanding team. As always, I’m thrilled to introduce you to our freshest and possibly most diverse new hires at Science Exchange.

Our new hires represent something we value deeply at Science Exchange – curiosity. They come from varied backgrounds and are in varied roles, but the commonality between them all is a drive to learn.

Meet the new members of our Science Exchange team below:

  • Ana Ulin’s resume would knock anyone’s socks off – she’s an electrical engineer who spent the last 8 years developing products at Google. During her time, she brought products that we all use like Google Maps and Google+ to the public, but what’s perhaps most impressive is that she learned to program by turning in handwritten coding assignments to her father starting at 7 years old! She’s truly a lifelong learner. She hit the ground running in our development team by immediately streamlining business operations with code and was awarded our FORCE award within 90 days.
  • Mennah Moustafa joins our Business Development team from Sigma-Aldrich where she lead their North American strategic sales over the course of ten years. It was love at first lunch when she interviewed, and she has quickly immersed herself in all things Science Exchange since joining. She is a unique blend of smiley, inquisitive, and strategic. These traits meant that she was digesting Science Exchange materials and creating new presentations during her first week and doing headstands to boot!
  • Charlotte Arthun joined us a few months ago as our Operations Manager. In addition to the game-changing efficiency she has brought to the office, Charlotte has instilled a passion for nature and zoology into our office environment. After her undergrad in biology, she spent years working as a field ecologist around the world – studying large cats like jaguars and pumas. Even now she exercises her curiosity by surveying river otters in the North Bay on weekends!
  • Michael Benzinou’s background is one-of-a-kind: academic, strategic, and entrepreneurial. In addition to his PhD in Molecular Biology, he lead business development at Crown Bioscience and recently took part in Lean Launchpad where he developed a way to match CRO’s with R&D projects. He is a key member of our Business Development team who has utilized his diverse background to create an exciting bench sharing initiative (more details soon) and work on our Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology. He is also one of the tallest and wittiest French men you will ever meet.

I hope you all have enjoyed reading about our new additions as much as I enjoy working with them. We are still hiring for more jobs, check out our open positions here.

– Dan

About the author

Dan Knox is a Co-Founder of Science Exchange. Dan helped create the initial version of Science Exchange and led the company’s successful seed and Series A fundraising efforts. Now, he looks after finance, legal, HR, and operations (and even commits the occasional line of code). Dan has MSc. in Economics from City University (London) and an MBA from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Management.

Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology will receive more than $500,000 worth of reagents and models

May 1, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth in Science Exchange News |

I’m excited to announce that top scientific suppliers BioLegend, Charles River Laboratories, Corning Incorporated, DDC Medical, EMD Millipore, Harlan Laboratories, LI-COR Biosciences, Mirus Bio, Novus Biologicals, and Sigma-Aldrich will provide more than $500,000 worth of research reagents and models to support one of our validation projects, the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology. The donation of reagents and models will increase the number of replication experiments that can be conducted for the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, a collaboration between Science Exchange and the Center for Open Science, supported by a $1.3 million grant from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

These companies chose to donate to the project, because they are committed to improving the quality of research and we are thrilled to have their support!

The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is independently replicating 50 recent, high-impact cancer biology studies using the Science Exchange network of expert labs. The aim of the project is to use independent replication studies to identify best practices that maximize reproducibility and facilitate an accurate accumulation of knowledge, enabling potentially impactful novel findings to be built upon by the scientific community.

Studies from Amgen and Bayer report that the majority of published results cannot be independently reproduced, but there has been no open systematic review of replication in cancer biology. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology will generate an open replication dataset made available on the Open Science Framework that can be used to examine the rate of reproducibility in this field and to study factors associated with the reproducibility of experimental results.

We continue to be amazed by the wide-ranging support for this project from the scientific community – thank you so much!

Of course, the more scientific supplies that are donated the more we can get done, so if you are involved with a company that is interested in donating please email me here.

About the author

Elizabeth Iorns is the CEO of Science Exchange and Director of the Reproducibility Initiative. Elizabeth conceived the idea for Science Exchange while an Assistant Professor at the University of Miami and as CEO she drives the company’s vision, strategy and growth. She is passionate about creating a new way to foster scientific collaboration that will break down existing silos, democratize access to scientific expertise and accelerate the speed of scientific discovery. Elizabeth has a Ph.D. in Cancer Biology from the Institute of Cancer Research in London, and conducted postdoctoral research in Cancer Biology from the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine where her research focused on identifying mechanisms of breast cancer development and progression.

Introducing the Laboratory Storefront

March 25, 2014 | Posted by Team in Lab Admin Tools, New Feature, Science Exchange News |

2 storefront ss

We are proud to announce that we have just launched our largest product update ever – our newly designed Laboratory Storefront platform which consolidates lab management tools in order to optimize project management and internal workflow for Science Exchange laboratories.

Our vision for Science Exchange has always been to improve the efficiency of scientific research through tools that promote collaboration. We’ve spent the past three years towards this goal, building a marketplace for researchers to search and order over 2000 experiments, and helping labs to promote and manage these services online. The Laboratory Storefront is a critical step towards streamlining and improving our laboratories’ internal processes.

Read the rest of this entry »

Whole Genome Sequencing for $1400 on the new Illumina HiSeq X Ten

February 19, 2014 | Posted by Brianne Villano in Science Exchange News |

The Science Exchange team’s vision is the democratization of science where any researcher can access the expertise and equipment they need to perform their research in a quick and efficient way.

In January, WIRED wrote an article about the new Illumina HiSeq X Ten, the first system capable of sequencing the human genome for $1,000. The machine consists of ten concurrent sequencers capable of producing 1.8 terabases of data every 3 days. This means it can sequence up to 18,000 genomes per year.

Image credit: Illumina

WIRED cautioned that the system designed for population-scale research with a $10 million price tag would be affordable for only a few.

The post also listed the only 3 institutes who already have the system in place including the Broad Institute of MIT (Boston, MA), the Garvan Institute of Medical Research (Sydney, Australia), and Macrogen (South Korea).

Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 6.04.56 PM

Last week, the Garvan Institute’s Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics listed their Illumina HiSeq X Ten on Science Exchange.

Our vision is coming true. This amazing technology that was previously ‘affordable for only a few’ is now available to all researchers.

You can visit the Kinghorn Centre’s Science Exchange storefront to access the Illumina HiSeq X Ten. It’s an exciting time to be a scientist!

Team

December 20, 2013 | Posted by Dan in Science Exchange News |
Science Exchange team (Dec 2013)

The Science Exchange team (December 2013)

When I did my last team related post, we had just finished a whirlwind of hiring that expanded the Science Exchange team to nine stellar and diverse “athletes” (in the Jason Freedman sense of the word). Well, I’m proud to share that the team has continued to grow. Over the last six months, we’ve been fortunate enough to find one perfect candidate after another.

So, without further ado, meet the newest additions to the team:

  • Conria D’Souza is the first Canadian to join the Science Exchange team. She is a perfect combination of social and scientific… making her an amazing fit for our Customer Development Manager position. Before she joined Science Exchange, she devoured everything that was ever written about us and maybe knew us better than we knew ourselves. After joining the team we discovered that Conria is also an amazing graphic artist… bonus! Read the rest of this entry »

Reproducibility Initiative receives $1.3M grant to validate 50 landmark cancer studies

October 16, 2013 | Posted by Elizabeth in Science Exchange News |

reproducibility_slide-631b61fa51116532492f460d8518fde0

Over a year ago, I began my mission to improve scientific reproducibility. I created the Reproducibility Initiative with PLOS, figshare, and Mendeley to provide a mechanism for scientists to independently replicate findings and be rewarded for doing so. We have made great strides in our effort such as the validation of more than 1000 antibodies for antibodies-online. However, today is the day that I have made progress very near and dear to my heart. The Reproducibility Initiative has received a $1.3 million grant from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation to validate 50 landmark cancer biology studies.

Read the rest of this entry »

Official Experimental Hierarchy

September 12, 2013 | Posted by Fraser Tan in Company, Lab Admin Tools, Science Exchange News |

Screen Shot 2013-09-11 at 8.26.39 PM

Over the past two years, Science Exchange has compiled and listed over 1800 unique services available for request. With services ranging in fields from biological methods to chemical analysis to microfabrication, we felt it was time to categorize these services by some logical order – a true experimental services hierarchy.

After several months of research and diligence, we have just launched the Official Experimental Hierarchy on Science Exchange. This new Hierarchy will interface with and improve the search functionality on Science Exchange, allowing users to quickly find the services they are looking for. Based on their search terms, users will enter the tree at the lower levels, and be able to browse around the nearby branches to identify the exact technique they are looking for, or find related techniques that best suits their needs. It will also provide a platform to ensure that our requesters and providers are speaking on the same terms.

Read the rest of this entry »

Our birthday wishes come true – #WhyIDoScience results

August 19, 2013 | Posted by Team in Science Exchange News |

We’ve blown out the candles and recovered from cake coma, so it’s time to share the amazing and thoughtful stories from our Science Exchange community!

We were overwhelmed with the enthusiasm and support from our users – many individuals were so passionate, they didn’t want to limit their response to 140 characters. As a result, we’ll be featuring their stories separately on the blog throughout the week. Read the rest of this entry »

Science Exchange is turning 2 – come celebrate with us!

August 12, 2013 | Posted by Team in Science Exchange News |
1927 Solvay Conference attendees including Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, and Max Planck decked out in their birthday best!

1927 Solvay Conference attendees with Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, and Max Planck decked out in their birthday best!

Everyone gets sentimental when their birthday rolls around. We’re lucky enough to still be focusing on our original goal – revolutionizing the way science is done. So for our birthday, we want to hear your stories:

Tell us why you became a scientist.

Post your story on TwitterFacebook, or Google+ with the #WhyIDoScience hashtag, or email us at team@scienceexchange.com with your story, and you might win a birthday gift of your own!

At the end of the week we’ll choose the top ten stories, feature them on our blog, and send you some Science Exchange swag.

Thank you for two great years and many more to come!

- Science Exchange Team

Independent Antibody Validation to Improve Research Quality

July 30, 2013 | Posted by Team in Science Exchange News |

validation_slide

Science Exchange partners with antibodies-online.com to independently validate commercial antibodies enabling researchers to choose high quality research reagents

PALO ALTO, Calif. — Press Release — Science Exchange, in partnership with the world’s largest marketplace for antibodies, antibodies-online (www.antibodies-online.com), announced today the launch of a program to independently validate thousands of commercial antibodies via the Science Exchange Independent Validation Service (www.scienceexchange.com/validation). This program will help scientists identify high quality antibodies, improving the quality of research results and preventing the waste of resources spent on ineffective antibodies.

“More than 70% of published research cannot be independently reproduced,” said Dr. Elizabeth Iorns, Science Exchange’s co-founder and CEO. “This has significant consequences for our ability to make scientific advances. One cause of this serious problem is the quality of reagents used in research studies. Our antibody validation program will directly tackle this problem, enabling scientists to identify independently validated antibodies that they can trust for their research.”

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