Small Biotech Stories: Eos Neuroscience

November 26, 2013 | Posted by Brianne Villano in Small Biotech Stories |

Eos Neuroscience is a company built on collaboration, featuring a unique team with expertise in transgenes, virology and gene expression, and retinal degeneration. Once they complete their preclinical stage, their intended userbase would be those with blindness attributed to photoreceptor degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration.

They are running into some problems in the process of preclinical research, however. Alan Horsager, Co-Founder and CSO, describes his experience, “As a whole, biotech needs to deeply reevaluate the process, all the way from discovery to market. It’s so arduous that so few impactful drugs make it to market. There are certain gene therapies making it through, but the path is not easy at all. We say ’20 years and $200 million.'”

In light of difficulties and the expense of developing technologies, companies like Alan’s are trying to find ways to do things more efficiently, and their team is so unique that it’s difficult to recreate that collaboration. So rather than trying to clone themselves, they’re on Science Exchange.

“Science Exchange provides the opportunity to bring experts together toward a common goal, a network of distributed team members.” says Alan. “You can’t have an organization that has all the people and equipment that you need. You need expertise in different areas and Science Exchange provides a central location where you can go to get the experts.”

If your business encompasses multiple research areas, it is often difficult to access all the equipment and researchers you need in house. Eos does a wide range of research including vector development, qPCR, and gene expression, but in varying degrees and not constantly. So having the ability to do all that in house when you’re not doing the research full-time doesn’t make much sense.

Alan elaborated, “You can hire a postdoc for $70K per year, and theoretically they do more than a PCR assay, but if they don’t do it right it takes extra time and there’s a lot of training involved. If you’re only doing a couple of different assays, it’s probably better to hire someone and do it internally. But if you’re doing a lot of different assays, it’s better to seek external experts because it’s a fraction of the cost.”

We have actually found that researchers can save up to 46% on various experiments like immunohistochemistry (IHC), cloning, and sequencing, so Alan is absolutely right. Any product that enables you to order services from scientific experts across the world at significant discounts is worth a second look.

About Eos Neuroscience:
Eos has designed and managed clinical programs in gene therapy and the eye and has been involved in all aspects of primary research including transgenes, virology and gene expression, and retinal degeneration. Their worldwide core of experts has expertise covering basic research through clinical/regulatory.

About the author

    Brianne is dedicated to customer support and development for Science Exchange. She     is a formally trained biologist with a M.S. in Biotechnology whose past experience at           Charles River Laboratories sparked a flame for building client relationships.

 

Trivia Night at Science Exchange

November 22, 2013 | Posted by Tess Mayall in Events |

 image

Last night, Bay Area biologists, physicists, engineers, and one geologist came together to answer the most pressing scientific questions.

Tesla_circa_1890    Things like (answers are below):

    What is the name of the band that sings Weird Science?

    What two categories did Marie Curie win her Nobel Prize in?   

    Who is in the image to the left?

We were thrilled with the level of knowledge and enthusiasm of the group –       we had no idea that there were such fearsome, science trivia-lites among         us!

A few highlights from the night:

  • Team Darwinners winning first place, after an epic music round naming every science song/artist known to man. Even Thomas Dolby!
  • CEO Elizabeth Iorns’ excited exclamation that Ernest Rutherford was a kiwi.
  • Team Pasteur’s many name changes: Team Pasteur => Pasteur’s Pasture => Pastry => Patrizzle earning them Microryza t-shirts.
  • Everyone learning they’re seasoning their food with halite.

A huge thanks to everyone that came, we’re looking forward to many more to come. Stay tuned!

Answers: Oingo Boingo, Physics and Chemistry, Nikola Tesla

About the author

Tess builds Science Exchange’s online and offline community of scientists and providers. She is a geologist by training, but considers herself a friend of scientists near and far.

 

 

Science Exchange Stories: Shawn Carbonell, Brain Surgery Dropout

November 13, 2013 | Posted by Tess Mayall in Scientist Spotlight, Stories |
Shawn Carbonell at his small lab space in San Francisco. Photo from Jackson Solway's Startup Portrait.

Shawn Carbonell at his small lab space in San Francisco. Photo from Jackson Solway’s Startup Portrait.

Have you ever had a big idea that burned a hole in your brain? Plagued you day after day? Well, that’s exactly what happened to Shawn Carbonell, the CEO and Chief Scientific Officer of OncoSynergy.

Although he had spent the last 18 years prepping for a career as an academic neurosurgeon, he couldn’t stop thinking about an idea he had that could help fight cancer.  He had many options available to him, but he risked it all because he wanted to get a drug to the clinic in the quickest way possible.

I talked with Shawn a few weeks ago, I was impressed not only with the passion he has embodied to develop his cancer therapies, but also the speed at which he has done so (P.S. I’ve visited Shawn’s lab in San Francisco, and can say, hands-down, it is the most efficient lab I’ve ever visited). Read the rest of this entry »

Provider Best Practices: List Services Using The Experiment Hierarchy

November 12, 2013 | Posted by Brianne Villano in Lab Admin Tools |

Providers on Science Exchange can easily list service offerings on their facility storefront for researchers to order. Our new experiment hierarchy makes it even easier.

Your Management section currently allows you to add service offerings using a text field that has real-time drop-down results of services that have the same keywords.

adding services.png Read the rest of this entry »

Science Exchange Stories: Interview with Shobhit Agrawal

November 6, 2013 | Posted by Tess Mayall in Stories |
_DSC0512 (2) (1)

Shobhit Agrawal on his way to Antarctica.

When Shobhit was in the final stages of his PhD he ran into an issue, he needed sequencing done for his project, but his institute didn’t have the sequencing platform he needed. With his advisor in Antarctica, it would be awhile before he even knew if he could get the outsourcing reimbursed, so he went out on a limb, he fronted the cost of the sequencing himself and used the DNA Sequencing Facility on Science Exchange to get results quicker.

I talked to Shobhit about his research, outsourcing experiments, and the future of PhD programs. His outlook is both unique and inspirational. Check out his thoughts below: Read the rest of this entry »

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