Science Exchange Stories: OncoSynergy, fighting brain cancer as the family business

January 21, 2014 | Posted by Tess Mayall in Stories |
Shawn Carbonell, MD, PhD and wife Anne-Marie Carbonell, MD, OncoSynergy’s new VP of Clinical Development

Shawn Carbonell, MD, PhD and wife Anne-Marie Carbonell, MD, OncoSynergy’s new VP of Clinical Development

This week I got to catch up with our user Shawn Carbonell and his biotech company OncoSynergy, who has made exciting progress in the 2 months since we last talked. They were honored with the Children’s Humanitarian Award from the Children’s Tumor Foundation at their annual Gala in New York City and have just announced they are the Social Media Sponsor of the 2014 Race for Hope for brain cancer research held in conjunction with Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure (ABC2) and the National Brain Tumor Society. However, perhaps most importantly, Shawn Carbonell’s wife, Anne-Marie Carbonell, has joined the OncoSynergy team as Vice President of Clinical Development.

To put it in his words, “When I found out she was single and was no longer in neurosurgery I made it my mission to both marry her and hire her. Last month both became reality.”

There are so many fascinating elements to Anne-Marie. Both Shawn and Anne-Marie successfully matched into neurosurgery residency only to find new career tracks; they’re now making the fight against brain cancer the family business. That’s only a small fraction of the incredible story, read the rest below! Read the rest of this entry »

New Feature: Improved Uploader

January 15, 2014 | Posted by Brianne Villano in Lab Admin Tools, New Feature |

In modern life, dissemination of information is largely digital. So the ability to quickly share that information is a necessity, especially for efficient research collaborations.

At Science Exchange, we receive feedback for site improvements daily and a consistent request was the file uploader. This was an opportunity to significantly upgrade a feature that would have a big impact on your experience and every order that goes through the site. Check out the changes!

 

1) Drag and Drop

Drag any file from your computer's hard drive and drop it into the field to upload.

Drag any file from your computer’s hard drive and drop it into the field to upload, or click the “Choose File” button and select your file that way.

Read the rest of this entry »

Science Exchange Stories: Marcus Welker PhD at Dartmouth

January 13, 2014 | Posted by Tess Mayall in Stories |
Marcus Welker collecting samples.

Marcus Welker collecting samples.

Marcus Welker is a 4th year PhD student at Dartmouth College studying salmon migration in the Northeast United States and southern Quebec, Canada. His hypotheses and methods are both surprising and fascinating – check out our interview below!

Q: What do you research?

A:  I study salmon – in particular, I’m interested in how they migrate.  Salmon are born in rivers, go out to the ocean or large lakes, and find their way back to the rivers where they were born. This has been known for 100’s of years, but in the last 50-60 years, people have tried to understand how they do it – what sensory mechanisms do they use and what is it about the environment that signals them home? – to improve hatchery practices habitat restoration and fisheries.

We believe that by smelling amino acids when they are in the river as juveniles they make this really powerful memory of the smell of the river (imprinting). Then they go to the ocean or lake and do their adult thing, get huge, and come back to their river of origin (homing), because they remember the smell of the amino acids and can discriminate their birth river from other rivers. Read the rest of this entry »

How To: Use Twitter for Science

January 9, 2014 | Posted by Brianne Villano in How To, Lab Admin Tools |
Screen Shot 2014-01-08 at 6.20.17 PM

My Twitter profile.

Twitter is a magical beast. It can connect people anywhere in the world. It can make or break a brand. It can bring together scientists who might never otherwise meet IRL – in real life.

Many social media channels  – Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, to name a few – accomplish all of those things as well, but each has its own use case, unintentional or designed.

Facebook – generally used for following brands, keeping up with friends and family, being a social resume where new friends can see what movies you have in common, RSVPing to events, etc.

Google+ – highly cerebral chats (if you know where to look) especially where science is concerned, establishing dominance in a field, showcasing your research comprehensively.

Pinterest – where science and art meet, a place to inspire young and old scientists alike by visually stunning research and nature images.

Twitter, however, seems to be an amalgamation of all the rest. Here are a few ways to use Twitter to your benefit.

1) Connect with people doing similar research

By using hashtags centered around research topics you’re either working on or interested in, you can follow along in the current conversations about those topics. Just search for the hashtag(s) you’re interested in and join the conversation. If you’re using a third-party client like Hootsuite or Tweetdeck, you can even save these searches for long-term interest. Read the rest of this entry »

About Science Exchange

We are transforming scientific collaboration by creating a marketplace where scientists can order experiments from the world's top labs.

Check the Science Exchange blog for updates, opinions, guest posts and the latest happenings at Science Exchange HQ!

Visit Science Exchange →

Subscribe to the blog
Never miss a post! Science Exchange blog posts delivered right to your inbox.
Thank you for joining the SciEx revolution!
Powered By WPFruits.com