The UCLA Microarray Core just received new HiSeq 3000 and HiSeq 4000 instruments

September 28, 2015 | Posted by Keith Osiewicz in Uncategorized |

The UCLA Clinical Microarray Core/JCCC Genomics Shared Resource (CMC/GSR), directed by Dr. Xinmin Li, just received new Illumina HiSeq 3000 and HiSeq 4000 instruments. These instruments greatly expand the lab’s ability to sequence nucleic acids and perform many next generation sequencing applications including whole genome and whole exome sequencing. Here is a table from the Illumina website describing the capabilities of these new instruments.

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View all of the the UCLA Microarray Core’s services.

 

How does Science Exchange rank service providers?

September 28, 2015 | Posted by Keith Osiewicz in How To |

At Science Exchange, we want to make it easier to find the best service providers to help you with your project. Our product development team has built features such as a search box that displays results as you type, and search results that are filterable to help you quickly find what you are seeking. These features are powered by a core search algorithm that references important service provider-specific information to rank the search results.

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Once you enter a search, the algorithm determines the relevancy of search results based on the keyword you entered. The algorithm then looks at the service provider storefronts that pass through this filter and ranks them based on a service provider score. This score is calculated by looking at the following features:

 

Responsiveness

Because we want requesters to hear back as soon as possible, service providers that respond to requests for quotes in a timely fashion have higher scores. We value providers who have consistently responded to their requests quickly. Plus, it is the polite thing to do. You are never penalized for declining requests. Declining a request is considered responsive behavior.

Productivity

The service provider that regularly and consistently completes orders has a higher score and will rank higher in the search results. Requesters are more comfortable working with proven providers. If you are a provider, learn more about sending your own quotes to help boost your productivity quotient.

Positive Recommendations

At Science Exchange, we offer people the chance to review service providers, and those that have many good reviews are ranked higher in the search results. However, we also take into account how long a service provider has been on Science Exchange. If you request a service from a lab, please write a review after the project is finished. If you are a service provider, please solicit recommendations from the requesters with which you work. You can also ask previous collaborators for endorsement; learn more.

New Lab Boost

We value our long-time Science Exchange service providers, but we also want to introduce new providers to the community effectively. Therefore, new providers receive a rankings boost during the first month after they join Science Exchange. If you are a service provider, take advantage of this boost by responding quickly to any requests and ideally completing projects so that when the boost goes away at the end of the first month, you will still appear high in the search results.

We will continue to optimize the search experience on Science Exchange. Check this blog regularly to stay informed of any changes.

 

Have an idea for a product or company? Enter your idea in the Blue Sky Bio Competition for a chance to win over $500K in prizes.

September 25, 2015 | Posted by Keith Osiewicz in Company, Events |

We at Science Exchange love new ideas, and so we are partnering with SynBioBeta to sponsor the SynBioBeta SF 2015-Blue Sky Bio Competition. If you have an idea for a product, project or new company, please enter the competition by submitting an application. You have a chance of winning $500K in prizes that will help you bring your idea to fruition. Please enter by 12:00 pm PST on October 2nd.Blue-Sky-Bio-Competition

This competition consists of two stages. In the first stage, the judges will review all of the entrants and winnow away the group to 3 finalists. These three finalists will then compete in the second stage of the competition which will take place live and on-stage during the SynBioBeta 2015 conference. You will have 6 minutes to present a PowerPoint presentation describing your idea. The audience will be the judges for this stage of the competition, and they will have 4 minutes to vote for the best idea. Results will be shown live on the stage screen and the 1st, 2nd & 3rd place winners will be displayed.

We are donating $100K in credits to be used on Science Exchange. With these credits the winner can choose from over 4,000 services from over 900 service providers. Our online marketplace enables you to choose your own service providers, or you can use our Concierge service where our friendly team helps you find the right service providers for your project.

The SynBioBeta SF 2015-Blue Sky Bio competition takes place in the in the Robertson Auditorium in the Mission Bay Conference Center on Wednesday, Nov. 4th, from 4:35 to 5:35. Learn more.

Two Papers Published in the Online Journal PeerJ; First Step to Reproducing Critical Prostate Cancer Findings.

September 22, 2015 | Posted by Keith Osiewicz in Research, Science Exchange News |

Science Exchange published two papers in PeerJ, the online journal, that are being funded by the Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative. This initiative seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer.  It is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Initiative, and Science Exchange.  These two papers represent the first step to reproducing the original experiments. Today’s papers are meant to report what the collaborators will do so the scientific community has a full understanding of the process. PeerJ will publish the final results of the replications.

The first paper, The Androgen Receptor Induces a Distinct Transcriptional Program in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Man by Sharma and colleagues, was originally published in Cancer Cell in 2013. Of thousands of targets for the androgen receptor (AR), the authors elucidated a subset of 16 core genes that were consistently down-regulated with castration and re-emerged with castration resistance. These 16 AR binding sites were distinct from those observed in cells in culture. The authors suggested that cellular context can have dramatic effects on downstream transcriptional regulation of AR binding sites. The present study will attempt to replicate Fig. 7C by comparing gene expression of the 16 core genes identified by Sharma and colleagues in xenograft tumor tissue compared to androgen treated LNCaP cells in vitro.

The second paper Androgen Receptor Splice Variants Determine Taxane Sensitivity in Prostate Cancer by Thadani-Mulero and colleagues was published in Cancer Research in 2014. The experiment that will be replicated is reported in Fig. 6A. Thadani-Mulero and colleagues generated xenografts from two prostate cancer cell lines; LuCaP 86.2, which expresses predominantly the ARv567 splice variant of the androgen receptor (AR), and LuCaP 23.1, which expresses the full length AR as well as the ARv7 variant. Treatment of the tumors with the taxane docetaxel showed that the drug inhibited tumor growth of the LuCaP 86.2 cells but not of the LuCaP 23.1 cells, indicating that expression of splice variants of the AR can affect sensitivity to docetaxel.

Labs listed on Science Exchange will perform the lab work. These labs include Nobel Life Sciences, ProNovus Bioscience LLC, and the Stem Cell and Xenograft Core at the University of Pennsylvania.

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