Visit Science Exchange and See Our New Look!

February 25, 2016 | Posted by Team in Company, Helpful products, New Feature, Science Exchange News |

For many people who use Science Exchange, a visit to the homepage is the first step in accomplishing their research objective. For requesters, service providers, or anyone using our network, the web experience is a crucial part of each project. With that in mind, we are excited to announce that we have refreshed the site, including an entirely new homepage. We have kept the same handy tools you will need to start and manage your research project, but improved the look and feel of some key pages. Search our marketplace for thousands of Science Exchange Verified Providers and request a quote in minutes. If your project is more specialized, you can partner with one of our staff scientists to find a perfect fit for your research needs with our concierge service. Every project is covered by the Science Exchange Guarantee, ensuring that your research can begin quickly, safely, and with complete IP protection. Science Exchange is an ideal partner for researchers who want to focus on science instead of sourcing, and progress instead of payment terms. We work with the world’s best suppliers to make scientific discovery faster, easier, and more reproducible. Providing scientists with a single relationship which manages compliance, contracts, and payments allows them to focus on the research goal at hand while collaborating with our cutting-edge providers. We think breakthrough discoveries should happen at the rate of science, not protracted negotiation. Take a look at our ever-growing network to explore how we can help with your next project.Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 4.34.47 PM

Kakapo 125 – Sequencing the genomes of all known kākāpō

February 1, 2016 | Posted by Team in Science Exchange News |

Kakapo-2

Science Exchange is pleased to announce it will be collaborating in the Kakapo 125 Project. The objective of this project is to sequence the genomes of all 125 known living kākāpō.

The kākāpō is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand. It is critically endangered; as of February 2016, the total known population is only 125 living individuals.

The Kākāpō Recovery Team relies on genetic information to manage kākāpō matings in order to ensure maximum genetic diversity. Having the whole genome of all remaining individuals would allow the team to better understand the relatedness of individuals to optimize breeding.

New Zealand Genomics LtdSequencing of the first 40 kākāpō genomes is already underway at Science Exchange’s newest New Zealand based service provider New Zealand Genomics Ltd (NZGL).

The Kakapo 125 Project is the latest project organized by The Genetic Rescue Foundation. The Genetic Rescue Foundation is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to advancing scientific techniques that enable us to preserve global biodiversity. It was founded by Science Exchange software engineer and citizen/wannabe scientist David Iorns.

The Genetic Rescue Foundation has successfully raised funding for the first 40 genomes but is actively fundraising to complete the remaining 85. A core component of this fundraising will be the Experiment.com crowdfunding campaign that will run from February 1st – April 30th 2016. If you would like to help save one of the world’s most unique and charismatic birds as well as playing a part in sequencing the genomes of every individual in an entire species please contribute to the project.

Fund this project

The Kakapo 125 Project is a collaboration between a number of government, nonprofit, iwi and commercial entities.

Kakapo 125 collaborators

All of the collaborators have played an important role in the project to-date. The following individuals have been particularly critical to the projects progression.

  • Andrew Digby, Science Advisor Kakapo/Takahe DOC – Andrew works for the Department of Conservation (DOC) in New Zealand. He is leading the Kakapo 125 Project and conceived the idea of sequencing the genomes of the entire kākāpō species.
  • Bruce Robertson, Molecular Ecologist, Otago University – Bruce’s research focuses on conservation genetics and molecular ecology. He has been working on kākāpō genetics since 1996.
  • Jason Howard, Neuroscientist, Duke University – Jason (in Erich Jarvis’s lab) and his team at Duke were the first to sequence the kākāpō genome.

Sequencing the genomes of all 125 known living kākāpō is an ambitious and exciting endeavor that will help save one of the world’s most endangered species. It will also create a rich, open access genetic dataset that will be the foundation of some compelling research in years to come. Science Exchange is proud to add the Kakapo 125 Project to its long list of impactful scientific projects facilitated and managed via its platform.

Download information about the project in a distributable, media friendly format.
Download press kit


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