The New Science Exchange Dashboard for Requesters

February 2, 2017 | Posted by Team in Company, Education, How To, New Feature |

Researchers requesting services who have recently logged in to your Science Exchange account may have noticed the improvements we have made to your Dashboard! We hope that these changes will make it even easier to communicate with your service providers, manage projects, and compare quotes. Ultimately, our goal is to help you make better decisions, faster, with maximum transparency.

In this post, we summarize what is new in the dashboard for requesters.

 

Request services even more easily

If you have not yet requested services through Science Exchange, the new dashboard makes doing so as easy as possible.  

Use the Marketplace for fastest access to providers. Type keywords into the Marketplace search bar, such as “ELISAs,” “Boston BioSource,” or “Cambridge MA,” to search our network of service providers. Requests are sent directly to the providers, giving you the fastest access to our network.

Enjoy white-glove sourcing with our Concierge service. Ask our Concierge service to find service providers by submitting the short webform. This will engage our Masters- and Ph.D.-trained Sourcing Managers, who will gather quotes from the best service providers for your project.

Dashboard-FTUE-01-1


Track requests at a glance

Spend more time on science, less time monitoring your request status. Once you have made requests, the new Dashboard delivers a consolidated view to help you keep track of:

  • Request status
  • With whom you are working
  • Both Marketplace and Concierge projects

As you can see below, the Dashboard makes it easy to identify and communicate with the people with whom you are working, for each project. If you have experience outsourcing research projects, you know well that better communication is key for obtaining reliable study results.

Dashboard-01-1

 

Brand new to the Dashboard is the addition of the Concierge Requests panel, which allows you to track your submitted projects. Once a Sourcing Manager has been assigned, their contact information will be displayed. Please reach out to your Sourcing Manager directly for updates on your Concierge requests.


Easily find the Marketplace request you are looking for

Once you have submitted numerous requests, you will find it useful to navigate from the Dashboard to the new Marketplace Requests page by clicking on “Marketplace Requests” to view them all. Here, you now have fine control over the way you view and manage your ongoing requests.

Orders
This page enables you to:

  1. Archive: Clean up your view by hovering over an individual request and clicking the archive icon. Archived requests will be excluded from the default view, but can still be found.
  2. Search: Quickly find your existing requests using any keywords.
  3. Filter: Narrow your view to requests of a specific status, or reveal archived orders.
  4. Sort: Arrange your orders either by Request Number (which orders them by creation) or by date of last activity.

Any questions? We would love your feedback on this long-anticipated improvement to our site.
Contact Science Exchange today!

Provider Reviews: Net Promoter Scores

October 25, 2016 | Posted by Christina Cordova in Company, Education, Helpful products |

One of the best advertisements for a product or service is a positive review from another customer.  Reviews and ratings are so compelling and commonplace, they help guide our choices in car repair, travel destinations, and sushi restaurants.  We think customer feedback is also incredibly useful when trying to find the right scientific service provider.  For this reason, we began collecting Net Promoter Scores (NPS) from our clients and sharing them on supplier storefronts.  

What is a Net Promoter Score?  In 2003 Bain & Company launched a new way to gauge customer loyalty and satisfaction by creating a feedback survey with a single question: “What is the likelihood that you would recommend Company X to a friend or colleague?”  Respondents answer this question on a scale of 0-10, with 10 being extremely likely and 0 being not at all likely.  Based on their response, customers who provide feedback are placed into one of three categories:

NPS-en

  • Promoters (9 or 10) are very satisfied clients who would urge others to buy from/work with the business
  • Passives (7 or 8) are satisfied, but unenthusiastic about their experience
  • Detractors (0-6) are unsatisfied customers who would share negative experiences about the company

 

The total Net Promoter Score is calculated by subtracting the number of detractors from promoters.  Identifying three key groups within a customer base allows for more targeted interaction with clients.  If someone marks a 6 or below, the company can follow up with that person and try to correct what went wrong.  

We took that idea and applied it to our feedback surveys for service providers.  Our rating system now includes detailed reviews contributed by other customers, as well as NPS information on each storefront.  We understand outsourcing decisions aren’t only based on price, but finding a service provider you can trust to conduct experiments vital to the success of your research.  In order to learn about our customers’ experience with a lab we ask the following questions:

  1. What is the likelihood that you would recommend (service provider) to a friend or colleague (0-10)
  2. How satisfied are you with the timeliness of the deliverables (0-10)
  3. How satisfied are you with the quality of the deliverables (0-10)

Integrating information like this on our platform is just one of the many ways Science Exchange provides industry insights that allow you to reduce risk when contracting with external service providers.  To read reviews and find the NPS information for a service provider, click on the Ratings tab on any storefront, as seen here.

Provider NPS image

Science Exchange empowers researchers to work with confidence and make informed outsourcing decisions across all industries. Search our Marketplace to choose from thousands of screened labs and feel free to add a review of your experience.  The unique feedback and NPS data you provide can help other teams find the right service provider for them.   

Find the right service provider for you and start your project today. 

Science Exchange is ISO 9001 Certified

September 16, 2016 | Posted by Christina Cordova in Company, Science Exchange News |

Science Exchange is proud to announce that we are now ISO 9001 certified. The Science Exchange team has always been invested in building a culture of continual improvement, and the work to get ISO certified underscores our commitment to delivering the highest quality services to our clients. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is the world’s largest facilitator of international standards and supervises national quality management system standards in over 150 countries.

What does an ISO Quality Management System (QMS) do?

A successful QMS system ensures that all aspects of business processes are efficient and responsive to organizational or client needs. Our rigorous QMS requires Science Exchange to adhere to certain standards and procedures which ensure fulfillment of our customer’s requirements. These guidelines provide us with a method of demonstrating our capability to provide services that ensure compliance with any and all applicable regulations across the globe, while continuously improving customer satisfaction.

What does ISO certification mean for our partners and customers?

Rigorous auditing conducted by an independent third party means doing business with Science Exchange secures a high level of quality assurance at every stage of your project. ISO compliance ensures we are working with consistent and effective methods, and that improving customer happiness is an ongoing goal for the entire team. These certification standards require continuous improvement and internal review; engaging clients for feedback and identifying areas of improvement will always be integral to our company philosophy.

ISO certification is just one initiative in our commitment to provide high-quality service to current and future partners. Visit Science Exchange and start your project today.

The Importance of Replication Studies

July 28, 2016 | Posted by Team in Company, Reproducibility, Research, Science Exchange News, Uncategorized |

My TEDMED talk about scientific reproducibility was released today, so I wanted to take the opportunity to provide some additional thoughts about the importance of replication studies.

Every year, billions of dollars are spent funding biomedical research, resulting in more than one million new publications presenting promising new results. This research is the foundation upon which new therapies will be developed to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.

In order to build upon this foundational research, these results must be reproducible. Simply put, this means that when an experiment is repeated, similar results are observed. Over the last five years, multiple groups have raised concerns over the reproducibility of biomedical studies, with some estimates indicating only ~20% of published results may be reproducible (Scott et al. 2008, Gordon et al. 2007, Prinz et al. 2011, Steward et al. 2012, Begley and Ellis 2012). The National Institutes of Health (NIH), the largest public funder of biomedical research, has stated, “There remains a troubling frequency of published reports that claim a significant result, but fail to be reproducible. As a funding agency, the NIH is deeply concerned about this problem”.

Despite the growing concern over lack of reproducibility, funding for replication studies, the only way to determine reproducibility, is still absent. With no funding systematically allocated to such studies, scientists almost never conduct replication studies. It would be interesting to obtain the exact numbers, but it appears that last year the NIH allocated $0 to funding replication studies, out of a $30B+ budget. In the absence of replication studies, scientists end up wasting precious time and resources trying to build on a vast, unreliable body of knowledge.

It is easy to see why funders might shy away from funding replication studies. Funders want to demonstrate their “impact,” and it is tempting for them to solely focus on funding novel exploratory findings that can more easily be published in high profile journals. This is a mistake. Funders should instead focus on how to truly achieve their stated goals of enhancing health, lengthening life, and reducing the burdens of illness and disability. Although allocating a portion of funding towards replication studies would divert funds from new discoveries, it would enable scientists to efficiently determine which discoveries were robust and reproducible and which were not. This would allow more rapid advancements by allowing scientists to build upon the most promising findings and avoid wasting their time and funding pursuing non-robust results.

Some researchers find the idea of replicating previous studies unnecessary or even offensive. However, it is the responsibility of the scientific community, including funders, to work as quickly and cost effectively as possible to make progress. Introducing replication studies as part of the process provides an effective way to enable this.

If you would like to see funding specifically allocated for replication studies, please register your support. We will share this information with funders in the hope that it will encourage them to establish funding programs specifically for replication studies to improve the speed and efficiency of progress in biomedical research.

by Elizabeth Iorns, Ph.D.

CEO and Co-Founder

Science Exchange

About Science Exchange

 

Science Exchange is the world’s leading marketplace for outsourced research. The Science Exchange network of 3000+ scientific service providers has run the experiments for the major replication studies that have been conducted to date including the largest biomedical replication study undertaken (Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology). Additional details are available here: https://www.scienceexchange.com/applications/reproducibility

 

References

  1. https://www.nih.gov/about-nih/what-we-do/budget#note
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed
  3. https://www.nih.gov/about-nih/what-we-do/mission-goals
  4. Scott et al. Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 9, 4-15 (2008)
  5. Gordon et al. Lancet Neurol. 6, 1045–1053 (2007)
  6. Prinz et al. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 10, 712 (2011)
  7. Stuart et al. Experimental Neurology 233, 597–605 (2012)
  8. Begley and Ellis. Nature. 483, 531-3 (2012)
  9. http://www.nature.com/news/policy-nih-plans-to-enhance-reproducibility-1.14586
  10. http://www.nature.com/news/reproducibility-the-risks-of-the-replication-drive-1.14184

 

 

Science Exchange Acquires OnDeckBiotech to Expand Scientific Services Marketplace in Biotech Industry

June 7, 2016 | Posted by Team in Company, Science Exchange News, Uncategorized |

Science Exchange, the world’s leading marketplace for scientific research, announced today that it has acquired OnDeckBiotech, an international community and marketplace that connects biopharmaceutical companies with contract service providers. The acquisition brings together two of the major platforms for outsourced scientific services, and strengthens Science Exchange’s market-leading position by significantly increasing its global network of contract research organizations, core facilities, and other scientific service suppliers.

“Over $40B a year is spent on outsourced scientific research by the top 50 pharmaceutical companies alone, and much of this spend is highly fragmented across thousands of individual scientific service suppliers. Platforms for outsourced scientific services, like Science Exchange and OnDeckBiotech, solve the challenges associated with this fragmentation by providing scientists with efficient access to a diverse network of qualified suppliers under a single relationship,” said Dr. Elizabeth Iorns, Co-founder & CEO of Science Exchange. In praising the fit of the two companies, Iorns added, “OnDeckBiotech has developed a number of strategic relationships with industry groups and research foundations which complement the direct channels Science Exchange has developed with biopharmaceutical, government, and academic researchers.” OnDeckBiotech’s relationships, which include MassBio through the MassBio Gateway, the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO) through BIO BizLink, and the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) through ADDF ACCESS, will continue to be supported by Science Exchange as part of its strategy to become the ubiquitous platform for scientific outsourcing across all disease areas and stages of research and development.

As part of the acquisition, Science Exchange will take over OnDeckBiotech’s office in Cambridge, MA, giving Science Exchange a physical presence in two of the world’s largest and fastest growing biotech research clusters. “Science Exchange already works with 8 of the 10 largest pharmaceutical companies, many of which have invested heavily in these two clusters.  Now with offices in Palo Alto and Cambridge, in addition to Account Managers operating remotely in San Diego, New York, and other core markets, our team is uniquely positioned to help researchers inside these organizations access the world’s leading scientific service providers and most innovative scientific technologies,” said Iorns.

OnDeckBiotech’s Founder & CEO, Cliff Culver, will join Science Exchange as VP, Strategy and General Manager, Boston as part of the acquisition. “Cliff has been a visionary in the outsourced scientific services space, and we’re incredibly excited for him to join our team and continue our joint mission of enabling better, faster, and more efficient scientific collaboration,” said Dan Knox, Co-founder & COO of Science Exchange. Culver added, “We can’t wait to get started working with Science Exchange. The industry consistently reports that time and effort spent identifying and managing outsourced contracts hurts research productivity. Our companies have each demonstrated the value we can create by addressing these challenges, and our combined platforms and networks are uniquely positioned to continue to lead the market.”

Iorns concluded, “The total transactional volume of experiments conducted through the Science Exchange platform grew over 500% in 2015, and the OnDeckBiotech acquisition will further accelerate our already remarkable growth in 2016.”

About Science Exchange

Since its founding in 2011, Science Exchange has become the world’s leading marketplace for scientific research. Through Science Exchange, researchers can securely access a network of 1,000s of screened and verified contract research organizations (CROs), academic labs, and government facilities that are available to conduct scientific experiments. Science Exchange has been used by researchers from over 2,500 different companies and organizations, including many large pharmaceutical companies and government research facilities like the NIH, the FDA, and NASA. The company’s mission is to enable breakthrough scientific discoveries by providing researchers with easy access to the world’s best service providers. To date, the company has raised over $30 million from Maverick Capital Ventures, Union Square Ventures, Index Ventures, OATV, the YC Continuity Fund, and others.

Dan Knox, Co-Founder And COO Will Be Speaking At LabLaunch in Monrovia, CA

April 5, 2016 | Posted by Team in Company, Events |

Dan Knox, Co-Founder and COO, will be speaking at LabLaunch in Monrovia, CA, about how to use Science Exchange to order experiments from the world’s best labs. This event is part of the “Biotalk” seminar series which is a monthly educational networking event to support the current and potential biotech entrepreneurs of Los Angeles.
Agendadan
6:00pm-Networking and Refreshments
6:30pm-Presentation
When
Thursday, April 14, 2016 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM (PDT)

Where
LabLaunch-Monrovia – 605 Huntington Drive #103, Monrovia, CA 91016

Register

Science Exchange Announces $25 Million in New Funding Led by Maverick Capital Ventures

March 23, 2016 | Posted by Team in Company, Science Exchange News, Uncategorized |

Science Exchange, the leading marketplace for scientific research, announced today that it has raised $25 million in new funding. The latest funding round was led by Maverick Capital Ventures and also included participation from Union Square Ventures, Index Ventures, YC Continuity Fund, Sam Altman, and others.

Since its founding in 2011, Science Exchange has become the world’s leading marketplace for scientific research services. The company provides secure access to a network of 1000s of screened and verified contract research organizations (CROs), academic labs, and government facilities that are available to conduct experiments on the behalf of scientists. The Science Exchange platform has been used by scientists from over 2,500 different companies and organizations. The company has experienced significant growth in the last 12 months, including seeing the total transactional volume of experiments conducted through the Science Exchange platform grow over 500% in 2015.

“Over $40B a year is spent on outsourced scientific research by the top 50 pharmaceutical companies alone. Much of this spend is highly fragmented across thousands of individual scientific service suppliers, and this fragmentation represents a challenge to both individual scientists and sourcing procurement departments,” said Dr. Elizabeth Iorns, Founder & CEO of Science Exchange. “The Science Exchange platform solves this challenge: we provide scientists with efficient access to a diverse network of qualified suppliers under a single relationship, and at the same time we provide sourcing departments with more information and control over their outsourcing spend.”

8 of the top 10 pharmaceutical companies now use Science Exchange, viewing it as a way to efficiently access innovative external resources. Science Exchange also helps tackle one of the most significant challenges facing the highly-trained researchers at these companies: time and resources spent identifying and managing outsourcing contracts. James Lillie, VP In Vitro Biology at Genzyme (a Sanofi company), was recently quoted as saying, “We now look at the Science Exchange as the best way of finding new outsourcing opportunities with collaborators and CROs. We’re shifting more of our efforts for new outsourcing contracts there.”

As part of the Series B, Maverick Capital Ventures Managing Partner David Singer (former Founder/CEO of Affymetrix, GeneSoft Pharmaceuticals, and Corcept Therapeutics) will join the company’s board. “We spent a lot of time evaluating the growing market for outsourced scientific services. We concluded first, that there is an expanding market need for a marketplace to aggregate the thousands of suppliers, and second, that Science Exchange is poised to become the ubiquitous platform for scientific outsourcing,” said Singer.

Andy Weissman, Partner at Union Square Ventures, who has been on the company’s board since 2013, agrees. “With over 500% growth in marketplace transaction volume in 2015 and some companies already spending over $1M each month on the platform, Science Exchange is the clear market leader,” said Weissman.

Science Exchange is headquartered in Palo Alto, CA, and has clients, including many large pharmaceutical companies, around the globe. The company has now raised over $30 million and plans to use the new funding to expand its team in all areas including product, engineering, sales, marketing, and customer success. The full list of investors in the latest round is Maverick Capital Ventures, Union Square Ventures, Index Ventures, OATV, YC Continuity Fund, Windham Venture Partners, Collaborative Fund, Fenwick & West, Jose Suarez (CEO of TEDMED), Sam Altman, Steve Case, Kal Vepuri, Jenny Haeg, Alexander Levy, Paul Buchheit, and Silicon Valley Bank.

 

 

 

Visit Science Exchange and See Our New Look!

February 25, 2016 | Posted by Team in Company, Helpful products, New Feature, Science Exchange News |

For many people who use Science Exchange, a visit to the homepage is the first step in accomplishing their research objective. For requesters, service providers, or anyone using our network, the web experience is a crucial part of each project. With that in mind, we are excited to announce that we have refreshed the site, including an entirely new homepage. We have kept the same handy tools you will need to start and manage your research project, but improved the look and feel of some key pages. Search our marketplace for thousands of Science Exchange Verified Providers and request a quote in minutes. If your project is more specialized, you can partner with one of our staff scientists to find a perfect fit for your research needs with our concierge service. Every project is covered by the Science Exchange Guarantee, ensuring that your research can begin quickly, safely, and with complete IP protection. Science Exchange is an ideal partner for researchers who want to focus on science instead of sourcing, and progress instead of payment terms. We work with the world’s best suppliers to make scientific discovery faster, easier, and more reproducible. Providing scientists with a single relationship which manages compliance, contracts, and payments allows them to focus on the research goal at hand while collaborating with our cutting-edge providers. We think breakthrough discoveries should happen at the rate of science, not protracted negotiation. Take a look at our ever-growing network to explore how we can help with your next project.Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 4.34.47 PM

Science Exchange Won Four Grants from the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie), which is funded by the Gates Foundation, to reanalyze published articles dealing with health in developing countries.

October 28, 2015 | Posted by Keith Osiewicz in Company, Reproducibility |

We won four grants to reanalyze four published journal articles in the field of public health. These grants covere four subjects: Cash transfers and sexually transmitted diseases, the necessary training of healthcare providers, circumcision and HIV and the affect of the US government’s spending in Africa on mortality. The grants come from 3ie, which is funded by the Gates Foundation. The work will be performed by a lab listed on Science Exchange: the University of Nebraska’s Center for Collaboration on Research Design and Analysis.

The grants cover various aspects of healthcare in developing countries. The first grant will analyze a paper published in Lancet in 2012 by Sarah Baird, Richard Garfein, Craig McIntosh and Berk Ozler. This paper, Effect of a Cash Transfer Programme for Schooling on Prevalence of HIV and Herpes Simplex Type 2 in Malawi: A Cluster Randomized Trial, showed that direct cash transfers decreased the prevalence of HIV and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) as well as the sexual behavior of the young women receiving transfers for 18 months. The second grant will reanalyze the 2012 paper published in Lancet, Task shifting of antiretroviral treatment from doctors to primary-care nurses in South Africa (STRETCH): a pragmatic, parallel, cluster-randomised trial. This paper examined the affect of using nurses, instead of scarce doctors to administer anti-retroviral treatment to patients with HIV. They found that STRETCH was not inferior to standard care and supports expanding the pool of ART prescribers beyond doctors to nurses. The third grant seeks to replicate the paper from 2011, Effect of circumcision of HIV-negative men on transmission of human papillomavirus to HIV-negative. This paper addresses an important question about HPV prevention and it evaluates male circumcision as a HPV prevention strategy among rural African HIV-negative women who lack both resources and vaccines that cover the existing high-risk HPV genotypes. The results from Wawer et al. (2011) provide strong support for use of male circumcision for HPV prevention and cervical neoplasia in HIV negative female partners. The fourth grant will examine a study published in JAMA in 2012 titled, HIV Development Assistance and Adult Mortality in Africa. This study investigates the relationship between increased funding to countries receiving aid through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR) and adult mortality more generally. PEPFAR is the initiative developed by President George W Bush which increased funding to select countries from 2004 to 2010. The main finding of the paper is that PEPFAR countries had dramatically lower mortality than non-PEPFAR countries.

Dr. Nicole Perfito, Science Exchange lead for these projects says, “Using Science Exchange to gather the resources to reanalyze these experiments means it can be done faster and cheaper than would normally occur.

The analysis of these papers will bring extra scientific rigor to the study of health in developing countries. The University of Nebraska’s Center for Collaboration on Research Design and Analysis will do the analysis of these journal articles under the direction of Dr. Nicole Perfito at Science Exchange. Once the results are complete, these replicated studies will be published in peer-reviewed journals.

Have an idea for a product or company? Enter your idea in the Blue Sky Bio Competition for a chance to win over $500K in prizes.

September 25, 2015 | Posted by Keith Osiewicz in Company, Events |

We at Science Exchange love new ideas, and so we are partnering with SynBioBeta to sponsor the SynBioBeta SF 2015-Blue Sky Bio Competition. If you have an idea for a product, project or new company, please enter the competition by submitting an application. You have a chance of winning $500K in prizes that will help you bring your idea to fruition. Please enter by 12:00 pm PST on October 2nd.Blue-Sky-Bio-Competition

This competition consists of two stages. In the first stage, the judges will review all of the entrants and winnow away the group to 3 finalists. These three finalists will then compete in the second stage of the competition which will take place live and on-stage during the SynBioBeta 2015 conference. You will have 6 minutes to present a PowerPoint presentation describing your idea. The audience will be the judges for this stage of the competition, and they will have 4 minutes to vote for the best idea. Results will be shown live on the stage screen and the 1st, 2nd & 3rd place winners will be displayed.

We are donating $100K in credits to be used on Science Exchange. With these credits the winner can choose from over 4,000 services from over 900 service providers. Our online marketplace enables you to choose your own service providers, or you can use our Concierge service where our friendly team helps you find the right service providers for your project.

The SynBioBeta SF 2015-Blue Sky Bio competition takes place in the in the Robertson Auditorium in the Mission Bay Conference Center on Wednesday, Nov. 4th, from 4:35 to 5:35. Learn more.

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