Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology will receive more than $500,000 worth of reagents and models

May 1, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth in Reproducibility |

I’m excited to announce that top scientific suppliers BioLegend, Charles River Laboratories, Corning Incorporated, DDC Medical, EMD Millipore, Harlan Laboratories, LI-COR Biosciences, Mirus Bio, Novus Biologicals, and Sigma-Aldrich will provide more than $500,000 worth of research reagents and models to support one of our validation projects, the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology. The donation of reagents and models will increase the number of replication experiments that can be conducted for the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, a collaboration between Science Exchange and the Center for Open Science, supported by a $1.3 million grant from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

These companies chose to donate to the project, because they are committed to improving the quality of research and we are thrilled to have their support!

The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is independently replicating 50 recent, high-impact cancer biology studies using the Science Exchange network of expert labs. The aim of the project is to use independent replication studies to identify best practices that maximize reproducibility and facilitate an accurate accumulation of knowledge, enabling potentially impactful novel findings to be built upon by the scientific community.

Studies from Amgen and Bayer report that the majority of published results cannot be independently reproduced, but there has been no open systematic review of replication in cancer biology. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology will generate an open replication dataset made available on the Open Science Framework that can be used to examine the rate of reproducibility in this field and to study factors associated with the reproducibility of experimental results.

We continue to be amazed by the wide-ranging support for this project from the scientific community – thank you so much!

Of course, the more scientific supplies that are donated the more we can get done, so if you are involved with a company that is interested in donating please email me here.

About the author

Elizabeth Iorns is the CEO of Science Exchange and Director of the Reproducibility Initiative. Elizabeth conceived the idea for Science Exchange while an Assistant Professor at the University of Miami and as CEO she drives the company’s vision, strategy and growth. She is passionate about creating a new way to foster scientific collaboration that will break down existing silos, democratize access to scientific expertise and accelerate the speed of scientific discovery. Elizabeth has a Ph.D. in Cancer Biology from the Institute of Cancer Research in London, and conducted postdoctoral research in Cancer Biology from the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine where her research focused on identifying mechanisms of breast cancer development and progression.

Guest post: Cut Your Lab Spending in Half

April 30, 2012 | Posted by Guest in Outsourcing Trends |

This is a guest post by Sean Seaver, the founder of P212121.com (full bio below).

Small suppliers of chemical and laboratory reagents are known to provide quality products at significantly reduced costs. And yet, large distributors such as  Sigma and Fisher often crowd out smaller entities, making it difficult for laboratories to find or access cheaper supplies.

Compounding matters is the difficulty small suppliers face in reaching customers. Small suppliers don’t have access to a large sales force, and can’t afford the standard costs associated with roadshows or conferences. They often lack the resources to build an online presence, either in-house or contracted, limiting the availability of online catalogs or pricing information, and making it difficult for scientists to see the benefits of their services.

Recognizing these factors, we’ve worked at P212121 to help bring greater transparency to the small chemical supplier market. The P212121 platform helps bring small suppliers and their pricing catalogs online, helping scientists save time and money.

Resultant savings have already been significant, especially in comparison to Sigma, Fisher, and other large distributors:

Read the rest of this entry »

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