First open-access reproducibility project reveals roadblocks to performing replication studies

roadblocks

Reproducibility has re-emerged at the forefront of public awareness this week, as the first five replication studies executed by the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology (RP:CB) have just been published in the open-access journal eLife. The project is a collaboration between Science Exchange and the Center for Open Science (COS) to independently replicate key experiments from […]

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Two Papers Published in the Online Journal PeerJ; First Step to Reproducing Critical Prostate Cancer Findings.

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Science Exchange published two papers in PeerJ, the online journal, that are being funded by the Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative. This initiative seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer.  It is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, […]

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The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology Moves Forward

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“Reproducibility is actually the heart of science. The fact that not everything is reproducible is not a surprise.” – Eric Lander, head of the Broad Institute at MIT in a recent Washington Post article.  “We’re always in a gray area between perfect truth and complete falsehood,” The best researchers can do is edge closer to truth. […]

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First Registered Reports for the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology are published

cancer-biology

We’re excited to announce that our introductory article and the first three of our Registered Reports have been published by our partner eLife. In “An open investigation of the reproducibility of cancer biology research”, the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology core team details the impetus for and the specific goals of the project: “The resulting open […]

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Science Exchange will be reproducing studies for the Movember Foundation-PCF Scientific Reproducibility Initiative

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We are proud to announce today that we have partnered with the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), with funding from the Movember Foundation, to reproduce findings that have implications for prostate cancer patients. We will be collaborating with PCF to identify faster, high-impact biomedical findings that that can improve early detection and new cures. PCF’s Chief […]

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Can Registered Reports help diagnose a reproducibility crisis?

reproducibility

There has been growing concern in the scientific community over the last several years about a lack of reproducible results in the biomedical research community. Recently, two large pharmaceutical companies (Amgen and Bayer) announced that they could only reproduce a small fraction of published preclinical cancer biology studies. These results have shocked the scientific community, […]

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eLife will publish Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology results

We are excited to announce that eLife has joined our partnership with the Center for Open Science to work on the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology! eLife is an open access journal co-founded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Wellcome Trust and the Max Plank Institute. We are proud to have the work of the […]

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Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology will receive more than $500,000 worth of reagents and models

cancer-biology

I’m excited to announce that top scientific suppliers BioLegend, Charles River Laboratories, Corning Incorporated, DDC Medical, EMD Millipore, Harlan Laboratories, LI-COR Biosciences, Mirus Bio, Novus Biologicals, and Sigma-Aldrich will provide more than $500,000 worth of research reagents and models to support one of our validation projects, the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology. The donation of reagents and […]

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Reproducibility through peer review

rank-higher

This week we are featuring a guest post on how peer review can improve reproducibility. Check out Aimee Whitcroft from Publons’ thoughts below. There has been much talk over the last few years about the fact that most research, particularly in the medical fields, may not be reproducible – a stunning waste of time and […]

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Reproducing the STAP Stem Cell Method

When the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency (STAP) stem cell papers were published there was tremendous excitement in the scientific community. The papers described a seemingly simple method to reprogram differentiated somatic cells into pluripotency  – a process that usually involves the addition of multiple transcription factors. The controversy around the papers comes from two separate […]

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