Kakapo 125 – Second 40 kākāpō sequenced

Science Exchange is a collaborator in the Kakapo 125 Project. The objective of this project is to sequence the genomes of all known living kākāpō. We’re pleased to share an update on the project’s progress. NZGL has completed sequencing the second 40 individual kākāpō! The project is now past the halfway point with approximately 70 […]

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Kakapo 125 – First 40 kākāpō sequenced

Science Exchange is a collaborator in the Kakapo 125 Project. The objective of this project is to sequence the genomes of all known living kākāpō. We’re pleased to share an update on the project’s progress. NZGL has completed sequencing the first 40 individual kākāpō! Sponsors of individual kākāpō genomes will shortly be receiving their custom […]

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A Voyage Through the PacBio Genome Galaxy

sequencing

We are pleased to support the Genome Galaxy Initiative from PacBio. SMRT Sequencing Technology manufacturer PacBio recently unveiled the Genome Galaxy Initiative. The Genome Galaxy Initiative, based on the Experiment platform, supports expedited, open-access genomic projects. It’s a central location for SMRT Sequencing-based projects seeking crowdfunding, and fosters a community of scientists and patrons interested in […]

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Kakapo 125 – Sequencing the genomes of all known kākāpō

Science Exchange is pleased to announce it will be collaborating in the Kakapo 125 Project. The objective of this project is to sequence the genomes of all 125 known living kākāpō. The kākāpō is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand. It is critically endangered; as […]

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Sequencing the genome of the extinct moa

sequencing-genome

The moa were the tallest birds ever to walk the face of the earth. The two largest species, Dinornis robustus and Dinornis novaezelandiae, reached about 3.6 m (12 ft) in height with neck outstretched, and weighed about 230 kg (510 lb). Ka ngaro i te ngaro a te Moa – Lost, like the Moa is lost. […]

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Science Exchange Stories: Eli Skipp, science meets art

weaving

Eli Skipp is one of the most unique users we’ve had. She is an artist who finds fun and interesting ways to integrate technology and science into her art. She successfully used Kickstarter to raise money to get her brother’s RNA sequenced using Science Exchange. Now she is loom weaving the sequence into a colorful, […]

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Crowdfunding as the future of science funding?

lab-initiated-quote

Academic labs face increasingly tight budgets within a down economy.  Myself being an open notebook scientist at the University of New Mexico, funding has been particularly difficult to come by, without much support from larger grants or agencies. Searching for alternatives, I have increasingly turned to online platforms for raising support and engagement for my […]

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Guest post: Funding new discoveries with Petridish.org!

petri-dish

This is a guest post by Matt Salzberg, Founder of Petridish.org (full bio below). If you’re a scientist, you know that funding is becoming harder and harder to find. Traditional sources of funding, such as grants from the National Science Foundation or the National Institute of Health are time intensive, restrictive and slow.  And application success rates […]

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